Detecting SSH brute forcing with Zeek

In this blog post, we will explore how Zeek detects SSH brute forcing. We will explore the SSH handshake to understand how it works. Next, I will demonstrate several test cases of Zeek detecting SSH brute forcing. Finally, this post will lay down the foundation to implement active defense controls with Zeek in future posts.

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Part 1: Install/Setup Zeek + pf_ring on Ubuntu 18.04 on Proxmox 5.3 + openVswitch

 

Monitoring your home network can be challenging without enterprise-grade equipment. Although monitoring your home network can prove to be difficult, Proxmox and Zeek provide the perfect solution to monitor your home network. This blog post will cover how to setup Zeek+PF_Ring to monitor network traffic on Proxmox.

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Logging OSquery with Rsyslog v8 – Love at first sight

This blog post is going to cover how to ingest OSquery logs with Rsyslog v8. Most setups I have come across have Rsyslog ingesting the logs from disk, but this setup will ingest logs via the system journal. OSquery supports writing logs to disk and to the system journal. This post also contains a setup via Ansible and a manual walkthrough. Lastly, explanations of Rsyslog and OSquery configs.

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Install/Setup Graylog 3 on Ubuntu 18.04 – Zeeks logs + threat intel pipeline

 

Graylog has released version 3 with new features and major changes. This blog post will explain how to setup up Graylog version 3 on an Ubuntu server. Once Graylog is running, we will explore setting up logging clients, logging inputs, data extractors, threat intel pipelines, Slack alerts, dashboards and more.

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Tales of a Blue Teamer: Detecting Powershell Empire shenanigans with Sysinternals

Sysinternals is my go to Windows toolkit for malware analysis, incident response, and troubleshooting. Sysinternals contain tools that enable the user to analyze the inner workings of a Windows system. In this blog post, I will be covering how to use Sysinternals in Red vs.Blue competitions to detect Red team activity.

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Tales of a red teamer: Deploying shenanigans to Windows with Ansible

Deployment is commonly referred to as “the process of distributing the red team’s malware into the blue team’s machines”. Ansible provides a mechanism to connect to a Window machine, configure it, run command(s), and copy files to the target. Therefore, I often say, “If it’s good for sys admins, it’s good for red team”. In this blog post, I have provided an Ansible playbook that can be used to distribute the red team’s shenanigans to a list of targets, regardless of the red teamer’s host OS.

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Part 1: Threat hunting with BRO/Zeek and EQL

One of the biggest challenges for blue teams is using logs to hunt for malicious activity. Tools like BRO provide fantastic logging of the events that transpired on a network but don’t provide a mechanism to ask those logs a question. Threat hunting is the process of generating a series of hypotheses about malicious activity that might be occurring on your network. EQL provides a tool that can ingest logs and provide the threat hunter a mechanism to ask questions to prove or disprove their hypotheses. Furthermore, I have extended the EQL platform to support Zeek/BRO logs for network-based threat hunting.

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PoC: Using Cloudflare as an HTTP C2 with Powershell Empire

For a red teamer, one of the biggest challenges is utilizing a command-and-control(C2) server without being discovered and blocked. This is because the detected traffic is not coming from a trusted source. One way around this is to use CloudFlare’s free HTTP reverse proxy service as your C2. By pivoting all HTTP traffic through these proxies, it becomes much harder for a network defender to detect malicious intent.

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Part 1: Running TOR exit node – Install/Setup exit node

In this blog post series, I will be covering how to setup a Tor exit node for security research. The educational goals of this series is to learn more about network security monitoring, logging, and enrichment to create a threat intelligence pipeline. My exit node will collect data that will be ingested and returned to the community as intelligence.

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Tales of a Red Teamer: How to setup a C2 infrastructure for Cobalt Strike – UB 2018

This past weekend, I had the pleasure of red teaming at University of Buffalo’s competition called Lockdown. It was a great competition and I had a lot of fun learning new red team tools and challenging the blue teamers on Windows. This blog post will focus on my C2 infrastructure setup for Cobalt Strike. I did a similar post last semester with PowerShell Empire, which can be found here.

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