Category Archives: Incident Response

Adventures of the Sherlock Holmes Memory Gopher: Dumping and analyzing memory with Osquery and Kolide

For several years I have always wanted to write an Osquery extension to perform memory dumps and analysis. I never got the time to do a deep dive into my idea but since I have been creating some Osquery-go extensions lately, I decided to take a crack at my idea. This blog post will provide a high overview of the architecture of these Osquery extensions for this project, how to generate memory dumps, and how to remotely analyze these memory dumps with Osquery. Follow me with another threat detection engineering experience with Osquery-go.

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Operation cleanup: Eradicating malware with Osquery and Kolide

This blog post is going to cover an Osquery extension that I engineered with osquery-go to eradicate malware. This extension has the ability to delete files, kill processes, delete directories, and can be used with the builtin YARA table. This blog post will act as documentation for the setup and operation of this Osquery extension.

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Creating my second Osquery extension with osquery-go

Here we go again! This blog post is tangential to my previous blog post on creating an Osquery extension with Python but this time we are using golang. Osquery is my favorite open-source security tool and golang is becoming a popular programming language so fusing them together allows us to engineer tools to detect threats. This blog post will build an Osquery-go extension to calculate the CommunityID of a network connection utilizing the Osquery-polylogyx extension pack to monitor network connections. In blog posts to follow, we will correlate network-based events monitored by Zeek and host-based events generated by Osquery using the CommunityID. So follow me again as your adventure guide on this development journey to make an Osquery extension with osquery-go.

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Creating my first Osquery extension to generate CommunityIDs with Osquery-python on Windows

Osquery is my favorite open-source security tool and Python is my favorite programming language so fusing them together allows us to engineer tools to detect threats. This blog post will build an Osquery-python extension to calculate the CommunityID of a network connection utilizing the Osquery-polylogyx extension pack to monitor network connections. In blog posts to follow, we will correlate network-based events generated by Zeek and host-based events generated by Osquery using the CommunityID. So follow me as your adventure guide on this development journey to make an Osquery extension with osquery-python.

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Install/Setup MISP on Ubuntu 18.04 with an intro to PyMISP

In this blog post, we are going to cover how to install MISP on Ubuntu 18.04. Once MISP is installed, we will do an introduction to the PyMISP API to store indicators of compromise (IOCs) in MISP and query IOCs from MISP. This blog post will serve as the foundation for future blog posts moving forward.

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Part 2: Intro to Threat Hunting – Understanding the attacker mindset with Powershell Empire and the Mandiant Attack Lifecycle

In this blog post, I continue my pursuit of knowledge to become a threat hunter. This blog post will introduce the following concepts: understanding the attacker mindset with the Mandiant Attack Lifecycle, performing a red team exercise to demonstrate the tools and techniques used by attackers with Powershell Empire, and observing how attacker activity leaves behind a trail of artifacts. These concepts will create the foundation we will use in future blog posts to hunt for malicious activity.

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PoC: Monitoring user browser activity with Osquery

This proof-of-concept (PoC) will demonstrate how to use Osquery to monitor the browser activity of users. Not only will this PoC collect browser activity, but it will also use VirusTotal to rank each URL to detect malicious activity. In addition to VirusTotal, this PoC will utilize Rsyslog, Osquery, Kafka, Splunk, Virustotal, Python3, and Docker as a logging pipeline. Once this pipeline has been implemented, your security team will have the ability to protect your user’s from today’s most serious threats on the web.

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Back in the saddle: Install/Setup Elastic stack 7.0 on Ubuntu 18.04

Wow, the last time I really used the Elastic Stack it was called the ELK stack, and it was version 2.0. A lot of things have changed since then, so I am going to do an updated post on installing and setting up the Elastic stack.

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Detecting malicious downloads with Osquery, Rsyslog, Kafka, Python3, and VirusTotal

This blog post will explore how to set up a simple logging pipeline to detect maliciously downloaded files. This setup will utilize technologies such as Osquery, Rsyslog, Kafka, Docker, Python3, and VirusTotal for a logging pipeline. If this pipeline detects a malicious file, a Slack alert will be triggered.

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Install/Setup Graylog 3 on Ubuntu 18.04 – Zeeks logs + threat intel pipeline

 

Graylog has released version 3 with new features and major changes. This blog post will explain how to setup up Graylog version 3 on an Ubuntu server. Once Graylog is running, we will explore setting up logging clients, logging inputs, data extractors, threat intel pipelines, Slack alerts, dashboards and more.

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